Sep 142017
 

Enzymes In Food: High-Enzyme Foods

 

Enzymes in food add to the enzymes made by our bodies. This is a nutritional benefit in addition to the vitamins, minerals, or other nutrients in the food. Some foods—all raw or cultured—have a high level of enzymes and are listed here. For the benefits of these foods, see the discussion below the list.

Here’s how food combining works:

Each macro nutrient (protein, carbohydrates, and fat) digests at a different speed and each requires different digestive enzymes to be broken down. If you eat foods at the same meal that have opposing digestive requirements, they’re considered bad food combinations. Bad food combinations can result in an intestinal backup, which can cause symptoms such as gas, bloating, and abdominal cramps.

 

General Food Combining Guidelines

 

1. Eat Fruit Alone

Fruit is a simple sugar that digests very rapidly (under 30 minutes), so combining fruit with other foods can slow down the process and cause digestive distress. You should eat fruit 30 minutes before a meal and 1 hour after. It’s still important to eat fruit even though it doesn’t combine well with other foods. It’s an excellent source of essential vitamins and minerals that we need for healthy cells, energy, and digestive function.

 

Let’s take eggs with fruit for example: Eggs are a protein, which can take between 3 to 4 hours to digest. Since the fruit only takes 20 to 30 minutes to digest, combining it with a protein will create digestive backup.  Eat fruit alone and on an empty stomach so that it doesn’t have the chance to ferment.  Fermentation in your GI tract not only leaves you feeling gassy and bloated, but can also create a feast for bad bacteria.

 

One exception to the rule would be smoothies: Fruit in smoothies already “chewed up”, so fruit can be combined with other nutrients in smoothies, such as chia seeds, avocado, olive oil, dark leafy greens, and plant protein. Because smoothies are already liquid they don’t stress the digestive system. Keep this in mind with other meals – chewing your food until it’s liquid will help support digestion, assimilation of nutrients, and overall health.

 

2. Pair Protein with Non-Starchy Vegetables

In order for protein to be digested, it needs an acidic environment and plenty of digestive enzymes. Protein can be paired with leafy greens and other non-starchy vegetables, such as asparagus, peppers, celery or broccoli. Since vegetables have their own enzymes, they don’t require an alkaline environment for digestion and therefore don’t interfere with the acidic environment required by protein.

 


List of High-Enzyme Foods

This list is compiled from Edward Howell’s Enzyme Nutrition, Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions, Anthony Cichoke’s The Complete Book of Enzyme Therapy, and Steve Meyerowitz’s Wheatgrass, Nature’s Finest Medicine. 

All foods are raw or (in the case of some fermented foods) never heated after fermentation.


Fruit

PapayaPapaya      List of High-Enzyme FoodsPineapple

 Enzymes are crucial to your health as they enable your body to break down food components into usable nutrients. Your intestines and pancreas produce a wide variety of enzymes, and certain foods contain these beneficial constituents or contain bacteria that produce them.

Certain foods are high in enzymes, too, though they’re broken down during digestion. While certain cultures eat high-enzyme foods for the perceived benefit of boosting digestion, there’s not much evidence to show that enzymes help. Several high-enzyme foods offer other benefits, though, so they’re still worthwhile additions to your diet.

Incorporate Kimchi

Fermented chilli peppers, cabbage, radishes and seasonings give kimchi its spicy and sour flavor, and researchers say the traditional Korean side dish has numerous health properties. Bacteria in kimchi produce beneficial enzymes, according to a review published in the May 2014 issue of the journal Biotechnology International. For example, the dextransucrase enzyme kimchi bacteria produce helps break down starches and the sugar sucrose. In addition, kimchi contains beta-carotene, vitamin C, fiber and chlorophyll.

Pick Apricots

Apricots are rich in a mixture of enzymes, including invertase, according to Anthony J. Cichoke, author of “Enzymes: The Sparks of Life.” The invertase enzyme breaks sucrose down into fructose and glucose units so your body can use these rapidly absorbing carbohydrates for quick energy. Invertase is also an antioxidant enzyme with free radical-scavenging activities. Antioxidants in your diet play a crucial role in preventing free radicals — unstable molecules — from causing cellular damage.

Enjoy Avocados

Avocados are a good source of various enzymes, including lipase, according to Cichoke. The lipase enzyme is needed to break down dietary fat. Your pancreas produces lipase, so it’s typically not vital to get it from your diet. Lipase supplements might help relieve indigestion, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, but it’s not clear whether dietary lipase offers the same benefit. Enjoy avocados on salads, and make guacamole by blending avocado with chopped tomato, onion and cilantro.

Go Bananas

In addition to their rich potassium content, bananas are a good source of the enzymes amylase and maltase. Amylase is one of the primary enzymes that breaks down carbohydrates found in foods like bread, potatoes and cereals. Like lipase, your pancreas produces amylase to facilitate digestion. Maltase breaks down maltose, also called malt sugar. Maltose is a less common sugar composed of two glucose units and found in corn syrup and beer.

Pick Pineapples

Pineapples contain bromelain, which consists of various enzymes that digest proteins. According to a review published in the journal Cancer Letters, research indicates bromelain may have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. When a bromelain supplement was tested on human platelets in the lab, it prevented them from sticking together, so it may be helpful for preventing blood clots, although more research in humans is needed.

Avocado
Banana
Bilberries
Cantaloupe
Dates
Figs
Grapes
Guava
Kiwi
Mango
Melons
Papaya
Pineapple
Saw palmetto berries


Vegetables, Grains, and Herbs

Ginger RootGinger Root

Aloe vera
Barley grass
Cucumbers
Garlic (raw)
Ginger root
Olive oil
Olives
Onions (raw)
Pau d’arco
Sprouted grains
Sprouts (According to Howell, sprouts contain the most enzymes when they are 1/2″ long.)
Wheat germ (raw)
Wheatgrass juice


Nuts and Seeds

Coconut (but not coconut oil)
Flaxseed
Germinated tree nuts
Unrefined oils


Sea Vegetables and Algae

Chlorella
Kelp (raw)
Spirulina


Mushrooms

Shiitake MushroomsShiitake Mushrooms

Maitake
Reishi
Shiitake


Animal Products

MilkMilk

Bee pollen
Honey (raw)
Royal jelly
Butter (raw and unpasteurized)
Milk (raw and unpasteurized)


Cultured Foods

Cheese
Kefir
Yogurt
Other cultured dairy products
Sauerkraut (raw)
Kimchee (raw)
Pickled vegetables (raw)
Natto
Miso
Soy sauce (traditionally made)
Tempeh

 


Benefits of high-enzyme foods

Enzymes are special proteins that act as the life force in living beings. In both plants and animals, enzymes carry out all the activities of metabolism. Some enzymes from the plant or animal’s life are retained in uncooked food. When you eat this food, the enzymes can continue their activity.

One activity is to help digest the food itself!

  • The raw avocado contains the enzyme lipase that breaks down the fat (lipids) in the avocado.
  • Unpasteurized milk contains lactase, the enzyme that breaks down the milk protein lactose. People with lactose intolerance actually lack the ability to produce enough lactase in their digestive system. They often can’t comfortably drink pasteurized milk, but can drink unpasteurized milk that includes its own lactase.
  • Raw beef contains the enzyme cathepsin. Beef that is aged is tenderized by the action of this enzyme.

Other foods contain enzymes that affect other foods.

  • Raw pineapple and raw papaya contain protease enzymes that digest protein. They are often used as tenderizers and marinades.

As we age, or under toxic conditions, our body’s ability to produce enzymes is compromised. Enzymes in food, or enzyme supplements, help take the pressure off our need to produce digestive enzymes. In particular, an overworked pancreas can be relieved.

Consumed enzymes do indeed help our bodies in ways not thoroughly understood, but the case for their promoting health and alleviating disease has been well made.


Unheated Food

High-enzyme foods are high-calorie, special superfoods such as those listed above that are also raw or never re-heated.

The heating of food destroys its enzymes. Cooking, canning, pasteurization – all permanently deactivate any enzymes in food.

All foods that have ANY enzymes are raw. They are:

  1. Raw: never been heated
  2. Raw cultured (fermented) foods
  3. Foods cultured after cooking and never re-heated. These contain enzymes from the fermentation process, not from the original food.

 

Specific enzymes work on specific foods. You need the right type of enzyme for the foods you want it to break down. Think of the foods you have problems with and then choose a product that contains at least those types of enzymes. Here is a list of the common enzyme types and foods they act on.

Digestive enzymes are enzymes that break down food into usable material. The major different types of digestive enzymes are:

amylase – breaks down carbohydrates, starches, and sugars which are prevalent in potatoes, fruits, vegetables, and many snack foods

• lactase – breaks down lactose (milk sugars)
• diastase – digests vegetable starch
• sucrase – digests complex sugars and starches
• maltase – digests disaccharides to monosaccharides (malt sugars)
• invertase – breaks down sucrose (table sugar)
• glucoamylase – breaks down starch to glucose
• alpha-glactosidase – facilitates digestion of beans, legumes, seeds,
roots, soy products, and underground stems

protease – breaks down proteins found in meats, nuts, eggs, and cheese

• pepsin – breaks down proteins into peptides
• peptidase – breaks down small peptide proteins to amino acids
• trypsin – derived from animal pancreas, breaks down proteins
• alpha – chymotrypsin, an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down proteins
• bromelain – derived from pineapple, breaks down a broad spectrum of proteins, has anti-inflammatory properties, effective over very wide pH range
• papain – derived from raw papaya, broad range of substrates and pH, works well breaking down small and large proteins

lipase – breaks down fats found in most dairy products, nuts, oils, and meat

cellulase – breaks down cellulose, plant fiber; not found in humans

other stuff

• betaine HCL – increases the hydrochloric acid content of the upper digestive system; activates the protein digesting enzyme pepsin in the stomach (does not influence plant- or fungal-derived enzymes)
• CereCalase™ – a unique cellulase complex from National Enzyme Company that maximizes fiber and cereal digestion and absorption of essential minerals; an exclusive blend of synergistic phytase, hemicellulase, and beta-glucanase
• endoprotease – cleaves peptide bonds from the interior of peptide chains
• exoprotease – cleaves off amino acids from the ends of peptide chains
• extract of ox bile – an animal-derived enzyme, stimulates the intestine to move
• fructooligosaccharides (FOS) – helps support the growth of friendly intestinal microbes, also inhibits the growth of harmful species
• L-glutamic acid – activates the protein digesting enzyme pepsin in the stomach
• lysozyme – an animal-derived enzyme, and a component of every lung cell; lysozyme is very important in the control of infections, attacks invading bacterial and viruses
• papayotin – from papaya
• pancreatin – an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down protein and fats
• pancrelipase – an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down protein, fats, and carbohydrates
• pectinase – breaks down the pectin in fruit
• phytase – digests phytic acid, allows minerals such as calcium, zinc,
copper, manganese, etc. to be more available by the body, but does not break down any food proteins
• xylanase – breaks down xylan sugars, works well with grains such as corn

Other general terms for enzymes referring to their general action instead of specific action

  • Endopeptidase: Enzymes that cleave proteins only on the inside
  • Exopeptidase: Enzymes that cleave proteins only on the outside (terminal) part
    • Aminopeptidase: Exopeptidase that cleaves at the amino terminating end
    • Carboxypeptidase: Exopeptidase that cleaves at the carboxy terminating end
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Sep 022017
 

      

  Himalayan Pink Rock Salt

To keep your sodium consumption in check, measure out the amount of salt you use. A one-quarter teaspoon of salt has 500 milligrams of sodium per serving. The daily recommended upper limit for sodium is 2,300 milligrams for healthy adults, and 1,500 milligrams for those who have a history of heart disease, are over 51 or who are African American.

Common salt, the crystals of common table salts are unnatural. Kosher salt is the same as table salt only larger coarse grains.  They are totally isolated and dead. To be able to be consumed by the body, the cells need to exert a big amount of energy. This results into great damage to the body but only receiving  2 minerals with zero gain. Table Salt should be for use outside the body! Table salt contributes to Heart disease which is the leading cause of death! Sea salt has the same amount of sodium as table salt!

Comparing it with sea salt, the sea salt has irregular crystalline structure. The minerals are way isolated with the other natural elements of the salt. It is for this reason that the body needs a lot of energy to metabolize but with lesser gain in absorbing the minerals.  Also you should consider the contaminants attached to sea salt.

Himalayan pink salt is sold as a gourmet salt for use in cooking and adding at the dinner table. Because of its minerals content, Himalayan salt is considered healthier than regular table salt, which often has additives, such as the anti-caking agent sodium ferrocyanide. The need in human nutrition for many of the minerals found in Himalayan salt remains unknown, and many of the minerals are found only in minute quantities. Himalayan salt contains some minerals that are toxic in large quantities, including lead and plutonium, but which are safe in trace amounts.

List of Elements

What Are the 84 Minerals in Himalayan Salt?
The elements found in Himalayan salt cover a wide range on the periodic table. Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

The Meadow lists elements found in Himalayan salt in addition to sodium and chloride. In alphabetical order, they are: actinium, aluminum, antimony, arsenic, astatine, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromine, cadmium, calcium, carbon, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluorine, francium, gadolinium, gallium, germanium, gold, hafnium, holmium, hydrogen, indium, iodine, iridium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, neptunium, nickel, niobium, nitrogen, osmium, oxygen, palladium, phosphorus, platinum, plutonium, polonium, potassium, praseodymium, protactinium, radium, rhenium, rhodium, rubidium, ruthenium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silicon, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfur, tantalum, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, uranium, vanadium, wolfram, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium.

The Himalayan pink salt has balanced crystalline. The crystals are not isolated from the 84 natural minerals. They are connected in such a very harmonious condition. This structure makes the energy balance; thus, absorption by the body is quite easy. The crystals provide primal energy to the body. The result is purely gain for the body with no energy loss.

Is pure, hand-mined salt found naturally; deep within the pristine Himalayan Mountains. Himalayan salt is a marketing term for Halite (commonly known as rock salt) from Pakistan, which began being sold by various companies in Europe, North America, and Australia in the early 21st century. It is mined in the Khewra Salt Mines, the second largest salt mine in the world, located in Khewra, Jhelum District, Punjab, Pakistan, about 300 km from the Himalayas, about 160 kilometers from Islamabad, and 260 kilometers from Lahore, and in the foothills of the Salt Range where Yaks are loaded with Salt and brought off the mountains. Crystallized more than 200 million years ago, ancient sea beds were covered by volcanic lava, protecting the salt from modern-day pollution, and lending to the belief that Himalayan Pink salt is the purest salt to be found on earth.

Searching for a pure, gourmet salt that also delivers amazing health benefits? Himalayan Pink Salt is one of the purest salts found on earth. When it comes to purity and mineral content, no other salt compares. Praised by health and culinary experts for centuries, Himalayan Pink Salt delivers many healing benefits to the body, including lowering blood pressure, improving circulation and detoxification from heavy metals.

Himalayan Pink Salt offers an intriguing glimpse at mineral packed crystals, which formed naturally within the earth. The many hues of pink, red and white are an indication of this salt’s rich and varying mineral and iron content. Incorporate Himalayan Pink Salt into your culinary presentation; use it in a clear salt grinder so your guests can experience all the sensory delights of this amazingly pure flavor enhancer. Use it liberally in pickling brines, or try your hand at salt-roasting fish or chicken for a moist and flavorful result.

The same replenishing nutrients that make Himalayan Pink salt prized in the gourmet world makes it an absolute treasure as a bath salt. Naturally rich in 84 nourishing and skin-replenishing minerals, bathing with Himalayan Pink bath salt is truly a renewing and therapeutic experience for mind & body. This 250 million year old, Jurassic era sea salt is known for its healing properties and is used by health professionals, spas and individuals who are interested in utilizing natural products to heal the body and relax the mind.

Himalayan Pink salt’s vivid pink color is a result of the trace elements in the salt, including energy-rich iron. These naturally present minerals (84) are essential for human health, which can be consumed and can be readily absorbed through bathing therapies. Himalayan salt has long been praised for its healing benefits; and is known for stimulating circulation, soothing sore muscles, helping to reduce acid reflux, lowering blood pressure, and removing toxins.

Himalayan Pink Crystal Salts are the very same therapeutic salts as the Himalayan Pink salts, but come in chunks from 10 to 60mm in size. These crystals are often used for Himalayan Sole (so-lay), a mixture (approx. 16 oz. to 1 tsp.) of water and Himalayan crystals. The 84 bio-available trace minerals in the Sole are believed to help balance the body’s alkaline/acidity, normalize blood pressure & dissolve and eliminate sediment, which in turn detoxifies the body. Best taken when you have your first drink of the day. Believed also to relieve muscle spasms and cramps. Himalayan salt crystals are also used as potpourri for decoration, essential oil diffusion and air purification by producing negative ions when heated (Salt Lamp).

More recently, large crystal rocks are also used as Salt lamps. A salt lamp is a lamp carved from a larger salt crystal, often colored, with an incandescent bulb or a candle inside. The lamps give an attractive glow and are suitable for use as nightlights or for ambient mood lighting.

Cleaning the Surrounding Environment

 Large Himalayan salt crystal lamps are particularly effective in eliminating the smell of chemicals, smoke, mold, mildew and allergens like dust, pollen and airborne bacteria. They are used often in school dorm rooms, art studios, hair styling work stations, home offices and work offices, at computer workstations where someone smokes and in doctor or dental examination rooms. People with allergies also benefit from being near these lamps.

Himalayan salt is called white gold because it contains ions of stored sunlight. Since it came from the undeveloped regions of the Himalayas, you can be sure that it contains the natural elements( 84 minerals) that can be found in the original, primal ocean. It has the essential minerals that are found in the body. Together with water, the stored primal energy in the salt can bring pure crystal of energy to the body.

This pure crystal has been exposed to earth pressure for millions and millions of years ago. And this pressure has perfected the geometric crystalline structure of Himalayan pink salt. The more perfect the geometric shape of the crystal, the more its energy content. And with this shape, the body can easily absorb this salt.

 

The Himalayan pink salt has balanced crystalline. The crystals are not isolated from the 84 natural minerals. They are connected in such a very harmonious condition. This structure makes the energy balance; thus, absorption by the body is quite easy. The crystals provide primal energy to the body. The result is purely gain for the body with no energy loss.  Keep your sodium consumption in check, measure out the amount of salt you use. A one-quarter teaspoon of salt has 500 milligrams of sodium per serving. The daily recommended upper limit for sodium is 2,300 milligrams for healthy adults, and 1,500 milligrams for those who have a history of heart disease, are over 51 or who are African American.

                                                                                                               

  • Natural unprocessed salt, such as  Himalayan pink salt, contains about 84 percent sodium chloride (just under 37 percent of which is pure sodium). The remaining 16 percent are naturally-occurring trace minerals, including silicon, phosphorus, and vanadium
  • Processed (table) salt contains 97.5 percent sodium chloride (just over 39 percent of which is sodium). The rest is man-made chemicals, such as moisture absorbents and flow agents, such as ferrocyanide and aluminosilicate.

 

Besides the basic differences in nutritional content, the processing—which involves drying the salt above 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit—also radically and detrimentally alters the chemical structure of the salt.

For a frame of reference, one teaspoon of regular table salt contains about 2.3 grams of sodium. According to some estimates, Americans get roughly four grams of sodium per day, which has long been thought to be too much for heart health.

Pink Salt -Using in Brine Therapy

Because of its mineral content, Himalayan salt can also be used in brine therapy, where it can help regulate your blood circulation and pressure, as well as treat skin diseases and help restore your acid-base balance. To take part in brine therapy, soak in a bath of dissolved Himalayan sea salt, which helps promote self-healing and detoxification through osmosis. Most commonly done in the form of a bath. As the sodium binds the water to the outer layer of your skin, moisture is preserved. Toxins are released from your body, while your skin absorbs the healthy minerals from the sodium into your body. It is recommended that the brine bath be as close as possible to normal body temperature before sweating, this enables absorption, around 97 degrees Fahrenheit, and that you use 2.2 lbs. of Himalayan salt for approximately every 26 to 32 gallons of water. Note that the science behind this is not complete, and it should be taken with a grain of salt.

To your Wellness. Back to top

Jun 142017
 

Fermentation is an ancient art that pre-dates writing and agriculture.

Unlock the True Potential of Vegetables

  • By Kaare Melby
    Organic Consumers Association
    Want to boost your immune system, increase the nutrient content in your food, improve your mental health and detox your body? Fermented vegetables are for you!Fermentation is the process that occurs when the natural bacteria in a vegetable break down the food’s complex elements into more digestible forms. When fermentation occurs, vegetables become easier to digest, allowing your body to work less, while reaping more benefits. And those benefits include higher levels of available nutrients, and live cultures of pro-biotic bacteria (kind of like the good stuff in yogurt). These pro-biotic bacteria can improve  your digestion, boost your immune system, improve your mental health, and detox your body.
  • Worried that fermenting is risky? No need! Fermented veggies are actually safer than raw vegetables, because the fermentation process actually kills off any unwanted or dangerous bacteria that may exist on the food prior to fermentation. According to the USDA, there has “never been a single case of food poisoning reported from fermented vegetables.”

    Fermented foods have been around for eons. Fermentation is an ancient art that pre-dates writing and agriculture. It’s often considered to be the practice that first ushered our ancient relatives from the natural world, into a culturally driven world. In fact, the word ‘culture’ is another word for fermentation. Sandor Katz, who has written several books on the subject, calls it “a health regimen, a gourmet art, a multicultural adventure, a form of activism, and a spiritual path, all rolled into one.”

    And the good news is that it’s a simple process that even the most novice cook can accomplish.

    To get started, you’ll want to choose vegetables that are fresh, local, and organic, as your ferment will be only as good as the ingredients you start with. You can ferment any vegetable, but some work better than others. It’s best if you experiment and find a mix of vegetables that you enjoy. Here at the OCA office, we like to mix as many fresh organic veggies together as possible. Not only does this create a variety of textures and flavors, but it also creates a wider variety of beneficial bacteria in the end product.

    If you are looking for a good place to start, cabbage is easy to process, and makes a great ferment. Raddishes, carrots, turnips, apples and beets also make good ferments. The fermentation process creates a wonderful flavor that is often refered to as “sour.” But you can add more or different flavors in any way you want. Onions and garlic are great additions, and you can use fresh or dry herbs, and spices, too. The best approach is to experiment until you discover what combination of flavors you like most.

    Here’s how to get started.

    What you need
    • Fresh vegetables
    • A knife or grater
    • A glass or ceramic jar for fermentation (quart sized, wide-mouth canning jars work well)
    • A smaller jar that fits inside the fermentation jar (small jelly jars work great)
    • Salt
    • Clean water
    • A clean towel
    • Rubber band to fit over the mouth of the fermentation jar
    • Herbs and spices (optional)

    What to do

    • Chop/shred/grate vegetables, salting lightly as you go. You want to get all of the vegetables as uniform in size as possible. This way, they ferment at the same rate. Vegetables like carrots and radishes do well grated, while it’s best to slice up that cabbage or onion. As you chop or grate the vegetables, add small pinches of salt. But not too much—fermentation only needs a little. Try tasting as you go. The vegetables should taste only slightly salty.

    • Mix the veggies well. You want to make sure that the salt is spread out evenly throughout all the vegetables. Taste the veggies, and add more salt to taste if needed. If you are going to add any herbs or spices, add them now.

    • Let the vegetables sit for 5 to 10 minutes. As they sit the salt will start to draw the liquid out of the vegetables.

    • Squeeze the vegetables to release their juices. Take handfuls of vegetables and squeeze as hard as you can, keeping the juice that comes out. You want to get as much juice out of them as possible.

    • Tightly pack the vegetables into the fermenting jar and cover with collected juice. As you fill the jar with the vegetables, be sure to pack them down tightly to the bottom of the jar. This will help release more juice, and remove any air bubbles that get stuck in the vegetables. Add any remaining juice once the jar is filled. Be sure there is enough liquid to completely cover the vegetables. If you need to, use a mixture of salt and water to bring the juice level up over the vegetables. You don’t need too much salt for the water, just enough to make it taste like seawater.

    • Fill the smaller jar with salt water, then place it on top of the vegetables in the fermenting jar. The purpose of the second jar is to hold the vegetables under the liquid in the jar. This will help the fermentation process by preventing “scum” from forming on the top of the ferment.

    • Cover the fermenting jar with a clean towel, and secure it with the rubber band. Using a towel to cover the jar ensures that gases can escape, without letting any dirt or bugs get in.

    • Let it ferment! Put the jar in an easily accessible area, and keep an eye on it. In about 24 hours you will begin to see air bubbles in the vegetables. This is how you know it’s working. After a few days, the ferment will start to smell sour. Taste it at every stage. This will help you determine how fermented you like your vegetables. Some people like “young” ferments that have only fermented a few days, while others like “mature” ferments that have been fermenting for months. If there is a white layer of “scum” that forms just scrape it off. It’s ok if you don’t get it all. When you like the flavor, remove the towel and smaller jar, put a lid on the fermentation jar and put it in your refrigerator. When the ferment cools down, the fermentation process rapidly slows, and you will be able to enjoy your fermented foods for several weeks or longer.

    That’s it! Now you know the secret to unlocking the true potential of your vegetables. To learn more, check out Sandor Katz’s book “Wild Fermentation,” available through Chelsea Green Publishing. Good luck and happy fermenting.

  • Kaare Melby is social media coordinator for the Organic Consumers Association.
May 302017
 

Public Health Library

 

While more people are embracing a healthy lifestyle, there are still plenty of people who feel confused or get mixed messages on what constitutes healthy living and healthy eating. Not to mention that eating healthy doesn’t seem like it’s easy on the pocketbook. At Public Health Library, we want to pull back the curtain and show that healthy living is accessible to everyone.

 

We can’t express enough the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, and nutrition is such an important part of health — it keeps our bodies running smoothly, improves our mood, and can even help cut down on medical bills and insurance rates.

 

Because we want everyone to have access to the best information on healthy living, I have put together a collection of valuable resources. I hope you find them useful and you will consider sharing them.

 

Healthy eating pyramid

 

How Nutrition in Addiction Treatment Speeds Recovery

 

Healthy Eating: Simple Ways to Plan, Enjoy and Stick to a Healthy Diet

 

Diet May Be as Important to Mental Health as It is to Physical Health

 

How to Optimize Your Home for Healthy, Stress-free Living

 

Eating Real Food on a Budget

 

The Ultimate Guide to Turning Your Home’s Yard into a Community Garden

 

Thank you for your time.

 

In good health, wellnesswillpower thanks

Steve Johnson

steve@publichealthlibrary.org

publichealthlibrary.org

May 092017
 

Why Aged Cheese is so Good for Your Heart (and Make You Live Longer Too)

metabolism  http://publin.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/walsh3.jpg

Story at-a-glance

  • Polyamines such as spermidine, spermine and putrescine are derivatives of amino acids, found both in food and your gut microbiota, and are critical for cellular growth and survival
  • Polyamines have potent anti-inflammatory activity, protect your DNA against free-radical damage and have been linked to longevity
  • In one recent study, those who had the highest spermidine levels had a 40 percent lower risk of heart failure

By Dr. Mercola

Cheese can be an excellent source of nutrition, especially if made from unpasteurized grass fed milk and aged according to tradition. Among the many valuable nutrients in real cheese is vitamin K2, which is important for heart, brain and bone health. The highest amounts of vitamin K2 can be found in Gouda, Brie and Edam. Other cheeses with lesser but still significant levels of K2 include cheddar, Colby, hard goat cheese, Swiss and Gruyere.

Cheese also provides a cornucopia of other vitamins (including vitamins A, D, B2 and B12), minerals (including calcium, zinc and phosphorous), amino acids and protein, as well as high-quality saturated and omega-3 fats. In recent years, a number of studies have exonerated cheese (especially full-fat cheese), showing higher cheese consumption results in improved health and aids weight management. For example:

  • High-fat cheese has been shown to raise your high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, thought to be protective against metabolic diseases and heart disease
  • Cheese consumption also helps prevent fatty liver and improves triglyceride and cholesterol levels — parameters used to gauge your cardiovascular disease risk
  • Full-fat cheese can be useful for weight management, in part by ramping up your metabolism
  • Roquefort cheese in particular has been linked to cardiovascular health and improved longevity, courtesy of its anti-inflammatory properties

Now, researchers have discovered yet another major compound in many cheeses that helps explain its beneficial impact on your health.

Polyamines in Cheese Linked to Longevity and Lower Disease Risk

Polyamines are derivatives of amino acids, found both in food and your gut microbiota, and are critical cellular growth and survival. Polyamines in turn contain chemicals such as spermidine and spermine (thus named as they were originally discovered in human semen) and putrescine. As noted by the Royal Society of Chemistry:

“Spermine derives from spermidine. And, spermidine, with the help of spermidine synthase, arises from another polyamine originally named for its role in rotting meat, called putrescine … [T]hese polyamines are the reason why sperm and, in the springtime, some species of trees, give off a spunky [odor] …”

Spermidine, spermine and putrescine all have potent anti-inflammatory activity, protect DNA against free-radical damage, and have been linked to longevity in animal studies — even when the animals were given the polyamines starting in middle age. As a group, polyamines are positively charged molecules that strongly interact with negatively charged molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. This is why they’re so important for cellular processes involving growth, division, differentiation and survival.

Spermine Protects Against Heart Disease

Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that when you increase levels of polyamines in an organism (including humans), cellular activity goes up and mortality goes down, in part by improving cardiovascular function and lowering blood pressure. In one recent study, which included 800 cheese-loving Italians, those who had the highest spermidine levels had a 40 percent lower risk of heart failure.

In another, spermine was not only found to offer potent protection against heart disease in both animals and humans, it was even found to counteract the adverse effects of a high-salt diet in salt-sensitive mice:

“[O]ral supplementation of the natural polyamine spermidine extends the lifespan of mice and exerts cardioprotective effects, reducing cardiac hypertrophy and preserving diastolic function in old mice. Spermidine feeding enhanced cardiac autophagy, mitophagy and mitochondrial respiration, and it also improved the mechano-elastical properties of cardiomyocytes in vivo, coinciding with … suppressed subclinical inflammation …  

In Dahl salt-sensitive rats that were fed a high-salt diet, a model for hypertension-induced congestive heart failure, spermidine feeding reduced systemic blood pressure, increased titin phosphorylation and prevented cardiac hypertrophy and a decline in diastolic function, thus delaying the progression to heart failure.

In humans, high levels of dietary spermidine, as assessed from food questionnaires, correlated with reduced blood pressure and a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease. Our results suggest a new and feasible strategy for protection against cardiovascular disease.”

Polyamines Help Combat Visible Signs of Aging and Increase Lifespan

Previous research showed transgenic mice bred to not produce spermine and spermidine suffered hair loss, developed more skin wrinkles and died at an earlier age than normal mice, suggesting polyamines play an important role in combating both visible signs of aging and early death.

Importantly, polyamines encourage cellular autophagy, which has serious implications for longevity. Autophagy means “self-eating” and refers to the processes by which your body cleans out debris, including toxins, and recycles damaged cell components — processes that tend to decline with age.

Lifetime feeding studies using rodents have linked spermidine-rich diets to as much as a 25 percent increase in lifespan. In human terms, that equates to an average lifespan of 100 rather than 81.

Animals given spermidine at a later age gained about 10 percent in longevity, which can still amount to several years’ worth of life for a human. As noted by Leyuan Liu, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M Institute of Biosciences and Technology’s Center for Translational Cancer Research:

“Only three interventions — severely cutting the number of calories consumed, restricting the amount of methionine (a type of amino acid found in meat and other proteins) in the diet and using the drug rapamycin — have been shown to truly prolong the lifespans of vertebrates, but eating less and not eating meat will not be welcomed by [the] general population, while rapamycin has shown to suppress the human immune system. Therefore, spermidine may be a better approach.”

Aside from its general anti-aging influence, autophagy is also one of the mechanisms by which polyamines help protect against cancer (specifically liver cancer) and Alzheimer’s disease.

Polyamines Correct Your Internal Body Clock

Interestingly, recent research has also shown that polyamines have the ability to restore your internal body clock, suggesting it might serve as a natural sleep aid. Improving sleep also helps lower your risk of chronic disease — including cancer and Alzheimer’s — and is important for longevity. According to the authors:

“Polyamines are … present in all living cells. Polyamine levels are maintained from the diet and de novo synthesis, and their decline with age is associated with various pathologies. Here we show that polyamine levels oscillate in a daily manner.

Both clock- and feeding-dependent mechanisms regulate the daily accumulation of key enzymes in polyamine biosynthesis … In turn, polyamines control the circadian period in cultured cells and animals by regulating the interaction between the core clock repressors PER2 and CRY1.

Importantly, we found that the decline in polyamine levels with age in mice is associated with a longer circadian period that can be reversed upon polyamine supplementation in the diet. Our findings suggest a crosstalk between circadian clocks and polyamine biosynthesis and open new possibilities for nutritional interventions against the decay in clock’s function with age.”

Fermentation Boosts Polyamine Content

Polyamines are found in many different foods, including the following (see listing below): As a general rule, fruits and cheese contain the highest levels of putrescine, vegetables have the highest levels of spermidine, and meat products have the most spermine. Research also shows polyamine levels are further increased through fermentation.

The Mediterranean diet, high in fresh vegetables and seafood, typically contains twice the amount of polyamines found in the average diet (which tends to be high in processed foods), and some scientists suggest the high polyamine content may be why the Mediterranean diet has such a positive influence on health and longevity.

Aged (fermented) cheese such as blue cheese, cheddar, Swiss, Brie, Gruyere, Manchego, Gouda and Parmesan Shell fish, including squid, oysters, crabs and scallops Fermented foods such as sauerkraut and miso Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower
Leafy greens Pears Mushrooms Green peas
Wheat germ Matcha green tea Nuts and seeds, including hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios and peanuts Chicken liver

Potential Contraindications

Some scientists and oncologists do warn that polyamine-rich diets may be contraindicated for those with psoriasis, as rapid skin cell regeneration may worsen the condition, and certain polyamine-sensitive cancers, such as prostate cancer. As noted in one study,

“… [D]ifferences in biological [behavior] of prostatic (cancer) cells are associated with changes in polyamine levels and/or the activity of their metabolic enzymes. Faulty antizyme regulation of polyamine homoeostasis may play an important role in the growth and progression of prostatic carcinoma. Treatment of human prostate carcinoma cells with inhibitors of polyamine metabolic enzymes or polyamine analogues induces cell growth arrest or (apoptotic) cell death.”

Eat Real Food for Optimal Health

If you love cheese, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest real cheese is a boon to your health, and there’s no reason to avoid it for fear of its fat content. The healthy fats found in real cheese will neither pack on pounds nor contribute to heart disease. On the contrary, these fats will actually boost your weight loss success and lower your cardiovascular health risks.

One caveat is to make sure you’re eating real cheese. Natural cheese is a simple fermented dairy product made with just a few basic ingredients — milk, starter culture, salt and an enzyme called rennet. Salt is a crucial ingredient for flavor, ripening and preservation.

You can tell a natural cheese by its label, which will state the name of the cheese variety, such as “cheddar cheese,” “blue cheese” or “Brie.” Real cheese also requires refrigeration. Processed cheeses are typically pasteurized and otherwise adulterated with a variety of additives that detract from their nutritional value. The tipoff on the label is the word “pasteurized.”

A lengthier list of ingredients is another way to distinguish processed cheese from the real thing. Velveeta is one example, with additives like sodium phosphate, sodium citronate and various coloring agents. A final clue is that most processed cheeses do not require refrigeration. So, be it Velveeta, Cheese Whiz, squeeze cheese, spray cheese or some other imposter — these are not real cheeses and have no redeeming value.

Even if you don’t like cheese, there are plenty of other foods rich in polyamines, as you can see from the list above, with fermented foods and beverages having some of the highest levels. Following a Mediterranean-style diet is one way to ensure you’re getting plenty of these anti-inflammatory, anti-aging compounds.

 http://irishoakandrope.com/WebRoot/Register365/Shops/950002428/505E/3548/B19F/BD4B/1DBC/C0A8/190B/0B19/Cheese_board.jpg

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Feb 052017
 

16 Cancer-Causing Foods You Should Avoid!

by  Caroline Bayard

Today, it seems like doctors link everything to causing cancer – it’s hard to determine what to really stay away from. While you think you may be doing the right thing for your health by drinking diet sodas or low-calorie popcorn, you’re actually eating some of the worst cancer-causing foods out there!

Below are 16 of the biggest carcinogen culprits that you probably eat every day. While you may be thinking “Everything causes cancer, so why bother changing my diet,” these 16 common food items have been scientifically shown to significantly increase the risk of cancers.

Please SHARE these 16 REALLY BAD foods that you should try to avoid at all costs!

#1 - Microwave popcorn

Sure it’s easy to pop a bag of popcorn in the microwave when you want a quick and tasty snack, but is it really worth risking yourself for liver, testicular and pancreatic cancer? The microwave popcorn bags you have in your cabinet are lined with carcinogenic chemicals AND so is a chemical in the popcorn itself, which creates the artificial butter flavor. If you can’t give up your favorite movie-time snack, it’s time to switch to the old-fashioned stove top or a kernel popping machine like you see at movie theaters.

#2 – Non-organic produce

#2 - Non-organic produce

You’re not alone in thinking ALL fruits and vegetables are good for you, but there are actually many dangerous pesticides sprayed on non-organic fruits that are linked to cancer. One example is Altrazine, a weed-killer used at many U.S. farms, but banned in Europe for causing severe problems in humans, such as infertility. Another problem with non-organic farmed produce is the use of toxic fertilizers and hormones used to make fruits and veggies bigger. In case you were wondering, the worst offenders are apples, followed by oranges, strawberries and grapes. ALWAYS wash fruits and veggies to be safe, but know that this doesn’t remove all pesticides.

#3 – Canned tomatoes

#3 - Canned tomatoes

I know what you’re thinking… You’ve likely heard how the nutrient Lycopene in tomatoes lowers cancer risks, but that benefit is completely cancelled out when the lining of canned tomatoes contain chemicals that disrupt hormonal activity in the body. Since tomatoes are so acidic, the chemical BPA actually leeches from the lining into the tomatoes. This toxic chemical has been linked to different cancers, heart disease and reproductive problems. Next time you feel like making a nice red sauce, go with a glass jar or stew the tomatoes yourself.

#4 – Processed meats

#4 - Processed meats

If you’re a carnivore, it may be hard to give up tasty deli sandwiches or cured meats to go with your wine and cheese, but the benefits definitely outweigh the cancerous risk. Processed meats are created with excessive salt and chemicals that damage our health. A study over 13 years showed that 1 out of 17 people died who ate 160 grams of processed meats. That’s 44 percent risk of cancer, as opposed to people who ate 20 grams or less. These meats are so packed with preservatives to look fresh, but they are well-known carcinogens, including the same things found in cigarette smoke.

#5 – Farm-raised salmon

#5 - Farm-raised salmon

Sure fish, especially salmon, is known as one of the healthiest foods out there, but unfortunately more than 60% of salmon in the U.S. is farm-raised… and could be deadly. Farm-raised fish are fed unnatural diets and contaminated with chemicals, antibiotics, pesticides and other known carcinogens found in materials like asbestos. Farmed salmon is also fattier than fresh salmon, which means it soaks up more toxins. Next time you want a healthy omega-3 packed, treat yourself to fresh Alaskan salmon instead.

#6 – Potato chips

#6 - Potato chips

They may be cheap, easy and delicious, but these crispy, addicting snacks can also be deadly. These fatty foods don’t only cause weight gain because of their high trans-fat content, they also have excessive sodium levels, which cause high blood pressure and artificial flavors, preservatives and colors. Another risk is the presence of acrymalide, a known carcinogen found in cigarettes. Try not to feed these quick snacks to yourself or your kids and choose pretzels, air-popped popcorn or baked apple chips instead.

#7 – Hydrogenated oils

#7 - Hydrogenated oils

Hydrogenated oils are vegetable oils, which cannot be naturally extracted like olive oil, soy or canola oil, they must be chemically removed. They are commonly used in many foods in your pantry to preserve and keep their shelf life, yet they are also linked to cancer, birth defects, heart disease and many other fatalities. NEVER cook with hydrogenated oils and check your labels for healthy oils like organic virgin coconut oil, olive, soy and canola instead.

#8 – Salty, pickled and smoked foods

#8 - Salty, pickled and smoked foods

They may be delicious, but many salty, pickled and smoked foods are processed with the preservative nitrate, which changes in our bodies to N-nitroso composites, which are associate with high cancer-developing risks. Smoked foods like meat or nuts absorb the smoke, which contains the same tar found in cigarettes. Colorectal and stomach cancer are linked to salty, pickled and smoked foods. Replace white salt for Pink Himalayan Salt which contains 84 bio-available minerals.

#9 – Processed white flour

#9 - Processed white flour

Oprah famously lost a lot of weight by cutting out anything white, especially the big culprit – white flour. You may have heard it’s bad for you, but you probably don’t realize that chemically-bleaching flour with chlorine gas kills all of it’s healthy nutrients. Chlorine gas can be deadly when inhaled, so why would we want it in our dinner? White flour also contains a high glycemic rate, which raises blood sugar and insulin levels and can directly cause diabetes. Cancerous tumors feed on sugar in the bloodstream, so by avoiding refined grains like processed white flour, you can avoid or starve deadly tumors.

#10 – GMO’s

#10 - GMO's

You may have heard the term GMO, but you’re not alone in not fully understanding the dangers of genetically modified organisms. Why would anyone want to eat something that sounds like that, right?! WRONG! After GMO’s were introduced in 1996, Americans with 3 or more chronic illnesses jumped from 7 to 13% in just 9 years. Allergies skyrocketed and so did Autism in children, reproductive and digestion problems. GM vegetables fed to rats caused development of horrifying tumors. One of the biggest culprits was GM bovine growth hormone found in milk. Stay away from these silent killers and choose certified organic, non-GMO verified and locally-grown foods that are produced without biotechnology. You’ll be thankful you did later on in life.

#11 – Refined sugars

#11 - Refined sugars

Cancer cells LOVE refined sugars, which spike insulin levels and and promote cancer growth. High-fructose corn syrup is considered the worst offender and it’s found in any sweet you can think of. It’s been known for a long time that cancer cells feed off of sugar, so with so many people addicted to sugary treats, it’s no wonder why cancer rates have skyrocketed.

#12 – Artificial sweeteners

#12 - Artificial sweeteners

While many people choose artificial sweeteners to lose weight, they are actually doing way worse damage to the body. People who consume artificial sweeteners in soda, coffee or diet-candy actually end up gaining weight and it does nothing to help those with diabetes. Aspartame found in artificial sweeteners has been known to cause convulsions, cataracts and gastro paresis. Also, artificial sweeteners do nothing to inhibit the body’s ability to monitor its daily calorie consumption, making us crave sweets even more. Another deadly toxin called DKP forms in the body from these fake sweets that produces cancer-causing chemicals, especially brain tumors. To sum it up, there is pretty much NEVER a good reason to ingest artificial sweeteners.

#13 – ANYTHING “diet”

#13 - ANYTHING "diet"

You may be thinking you’re doing the right thing when choosing a food with a “diet” or “low-fat” label, but you’re actually doing way more harm than good. Chemical artificial sweetener aspartame, again, is the big culprit, causing cancer, birth defects and heart problems. Think about it – anything “diet” is chemically processed and not REAL food. These foods also contain additives like ones found in cocaine to make you feel good, but also be addicting. Be smart and eat nature’s delicious, natural foods – organic only, of course!

#14 – Alcohol

#14 - Alcohol

Alcohol use is the second leading cause of cancer, right behind tobacco use. While a moderate or low consumption of alcohol can be healthy and lead to a reduced risk of heart disease, excessive drinking is known to cause heart failure, stroke, and sudden death. Excessive alcohol use is the biggest cause of mouth, esophagus, liver, colon, mouth, rectum and breast cancers. Don’t worry! You don’t need to give up your glass of wine with dinner, but, for your health’s sake, stick to one.

#15 – Red meat

#15 - Red meat

If you love a delicious steak now and then, don’t worry! Red meat is actually a good thing in your diet in small doses, but only if it’s grass-fed beef, which can actually help fight certain cancers. However, people who eat meat like hamburgers every day have a greater risk in developing deadly cancers, upping their risk to 22% in men and 20% in women. Red meat is particularly good at causing colon cancer. So, enjoy your steak dinner now and then, but don’t do it every night of the week and when you do crave red meat, stick to grass-fed, organic beef.

#16 – Soft drinks

#16 - Soft drinks

Soft drinks, soda, pop… no matter what you call it, it’s still detrimental to your health! Soda is packed full of calories, sugar and artificial ingredients, and has ZERO nutritional benefit. One can of soda contains about ten packets of sugar and most popular diet and sugared sodas are nearly as corrosive to dental enamel as battery acid. Think the occasional soda won’t hurt? Studies have shown that only drinking two sodas per week nearly doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer. There are plenty of alternatives out there, so next time you’re craving something sweet, think about what you’re putting into your body. Try squeezing half a lemon in your water with a little Chia seed and a dash of pink salt for alkaline water.Your health is an investment, never forget that!

Jan 232017
 

KENAF       

(Hibiscus Cannabinus)           Eddie Kenaf Field A                                                 Kenaf SeedsKenaf Leaf Everglades

 

By

Eddie D Katz

A cellulose fiber plant dating 4,000 years back with historical roots in North East Africa. Kenaf has a botanical relationship with cotton, okra and hemp; a member of the hibiscus family.

There are several varieties of Kenaf (broad and palmate- segmented like hemp) and has been studied since the 1930’s at the University of Mississippi. Tender young leaves are used as alternative forage for livestock and food eaten by Africans, East Indians and Asians for 1,000 + years. In Pakistan it is called “Gongoora”.  As food, for example, it is a great salad addition (green leafy texture like spinach with a citrus flavor).  Nutritionally potent with high levels of calcium, selenium, protein, omega fatty acids, nitrogen, etc.

Kenaf is totally earth-friendly.  All you need is water and fertilizer to grow as high as 20 feet in about 150 days.  Having no natural predators, growing Kenaf nourishes the soil and cleans the air.  The flowers are pretty yellow-white blooms with a deep red center that opens at sunrise and closes at night.  Harvesting Kenaf three times during the growing season (to 5 feet) produces tender young leaf for highest nutrition (wet or dry).  Food for humans–forage for livestock.Growing Kenaf for the rest of the season yields stock and core material that can be made into paper and textile products, animal bedding, soil remediation (pollution buster–water, land and air).  Highest organic oil absorbancy to a 92% clean up, starting as soon as you apply it.  One pound of Kenaf absorbs 1.66 gallons of oil or over 11 pounds of oil.  Amazingly absorbs hydrocarbon products up to 12 times its own weight.  Environmentally safe and correct.  A great alternative to plywood (save the old growth trees).  For the garden it’s a great mulch.

Much can be said! Food,Clothing, Building Material( Plywood, Brick, Plastics) Cleans the Soil,Water and Air.  A remedy that we should act on now.  Proven environmentally correct, one that should be used to make paper without killing trees and it doesn’t need insecticides or fungicides.  There’s no need for importing from out-of-state any type of sawdust (substrate), bedding for livestock, mulch for gardens.  EPA approved for 20 years.  Bioremediation (clean up method converting contaminants such as creosote preservatives, PCP-pentachlorophenol, petroleum products into harmless byproducts, i.e. carbon dioxide and water.  Kenaf contains indigenous hydrocarbons digesting microbes without any cultures, preservatives or stablizers.  We can balance our pollution problem right here, right now!  Use Kenaf everywhere.

OIL SUCK:  Just a little sucks a lot. Kenaf manufactured locally by American farmers, is all natural and biodegradable. Kenaf absorbs up to 12 times its own weight. Kenaf assimilates pollution. Kenaf is a remedy for balancing pollution from industrial, military and lakes.  Store 2-5 pound bags of Kenaf in cars, boats and trucks.  Helps keep available proven clean up materials close by.   Do your part–clean the ground and water.  It will help clean our air, an incentive to reduce greenhouse effects.  Need Seeds? Inquire about a Kenaf Presentation. Contact us at WellnessWillpower.

                               Future   Green   Industries

Personal use

  • Food (leaves raw or cooked) for Humans and livestock
  • Dehydrated — freeze-dried — juiced — pickled (picture of pickled Kenaf in oil and garlic)
  • High in nitrogen, protein, calcium, selenium, omegas
  • Seeds yield nutritious food grade oil

 Agricultural benefits

  • Soil remediation – biodegradable (can be disposed in compost)
  • Absorbs oil 12 times it’s own weight
  • Highest organic oil absorbency tested by the us navy
  • Nourishes the soil – soil less potting mix
  • Landfills/ restore environmental balance
  • Store 2-5 lb. Bags of fine dust in cars, boats, trucks
  •  Kenaf Cleans the air as it grows (more co2 absorption)

 Industrial applications                                                         Kenaf Absorbent

  • Building materials that are environmentally safe
  • Paper 100% free of tree and chlorine
  • Pulp — Pellets
  • Particleboard — Composites
  • Lost circulation media/Oil well mud mixed with kenaf fiber
  • Pavers — Block
  • Grass erosion mats –- Seeded mats — Mats for roads of the future
  • Thermo Plastic extender (bio-degradable plastics) — auto industry
  • Soil Neutralizer — landfills, farms, beaches
  • Filter Applications –- water treatment plants (pools, water and air)
  • Oil — Bio-fuel -– industrial lubricants -– cosmetics
  • Containment booms –- absorptive booms -– absorptive blankets
  • Insulation material –- non toxic

 Textiles

  • Clothing
  • Jute (java jute) Indonesia – Burlap North America
  • Cordage
  • Upholstery
  • Canvas – sails

 Animal Bedding                        Animal Bedding

  • Alternative to sawdust (premium grade) no need to import
  • Many times more absorbent than wood shavings
  • Animal litter – low dust – non toxic
  • Preferred for reptiles and horses with allergy problems

    KENAF

       Facts

1.  History: Indigenous of southern Asia, Africa, Middle East.

2. Age: Cultivated for at least 4000 years – originating in Egypt.

3. Yield: Kenaf may yield 6 to 10 tons of dry fiber per acre. Per year. This is 3 to 5 times greater than the yield for pine, which requires 7   to  40 years before they are ready for harvest. 5000 acres produce pulp to supply paper plant 200 tons a day.

4.  Fiber: The outer fiber or bast makes up 40% of the stalks dry weight; the inner fiber or core makes up the other 60%.

5.  Processing: Can be processed in a mechanical fiber separator similar to a cotton gin.

6.  Growth: In the right climate, kenaf grows 14 feet tall in 4 to 5 months and is an annual. Environmentally safe.

7.  Harvesting: Harvesting kenaf 3 times during the growing season (to 5 feet) produces tender young leaf for highest nutrition (wet or dry).

8.  Flowers: Kenaf flowers at the end of the growing season, producing showy hibiscus-like blossoms.

9.  Requirements: Requires a minimum of fertilizers, pesticides, and water in comparison to other row crops.

10. Growing areas: Almost all growing areas of U.S. kenaf, seed cannot mature. You need 60 to 90 days frost free to germinate. Arizona and southwest deserts can produce mature seed.

11. Seeds: 15,000 to 20,000 seeds per pound. Varieties include; Everglades41, Dowling, Whitten, tainung2, all have broad shape leaf, tainung2 has both palmate and broad shape leaf. Seed Price range: $8.50 for 240+, advance order: $2.80/lb. Minimum order 2000 lbs. (Kenaf.seed.com)

12. Absorption:  Cleans the air 3 to 9 times more than other plants in Co2 Absorption. Absorbs oil up to 12 times its own weight. Neutralizes oil toxicity up to 92%.

Summary: America has studied KENAF enough for 80 years. I have been knocking on heads to start businesses for 14 years now!

                     Just a little Sucks Alot

Better than any Sponge-  Absorbs 12 times its own weight-  Oil Spills are happening Now. Its time to get this green industry on line now!

By Eddie D Katz
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Nov 232016
 

For Optimal Health, Opt for Organic Food

Go Organic

Go Organic

 

A large number of studies have shown that organic foods:

  • Are less likely to be contaminated with pesticide residues. (Synthetic chemicals are not permitted in organic agriculture, yet can occur due to contamination from nearby conventional farms.)
  • Contain fewer heavy metals (on average 48 percent lower levels of cadmium for example).
  • Contain anywhere from 18 to 69 percent more antioxidants than conventionally-grown varieties.
  • May in some cases be more nutrient-dense. For example, one 2010 study which was partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), found that organic strawberries were more nutrient-rich than non-organic strawberries.Set in Motion Proper Digestion

If you live in the U.S., the following organizations can help you locate farm-fresh foods:

EatWild.com

EatWild.com provides lists of farmers known to produce wholesome raw dairy products as well as grass-fed beef and other farm-fresh produce (although not all are certified organic). Here you can also find information about local farmers markets, as well as local stores and restaurants that sell grass-fed products.

Weston A. Price Foundation

Weston A. Price has local chapters in most states, and many of them are connected with buying clubs in which you can easily purchase organic foods, including grass fed raw dairy products like milk and butter.

Grassfed Exchange

The Grassfed Exchange has a listing of producers selling organic and grass-fed meats across the U.S.

Local Harvest

This website will help you find farmers markets, family farms, and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area where you can buy produce, grass-fed meats, and many other goodies.

Farmers Markets

A national listing of farmers markets.

Eat Well Guide: Wholesome Food from Healthy Animals

The Eat Well Guide is a free online directory of sustainably raised meat, poultry, dairy, and eggs from farms, stores, restaurants, inns, hotels and online outlets in the United States and Canada.

Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA)

CISA is dedicated to sustaining agriculture and promoting the products of small farms.

FoodRoutes

The FoodRoutes “Find Good Food” map can help you connect with local farmers to find the freshest, tastiest food possible. On their interactive map, you can find a listing for local farmers, CSAs and markets near you.

The Cornucopia Institute

The Cornucopia Institute maintains web-based tools rating all certified organic brands of eggs, dairy products, and other commodities, based on their ethical sourcing and authentic farming practices separating CAFO “organic” production from authentic organic practices.

RealMilk.com

If you’re still unsure of where to find raw milk, check out Raw-Milk-Facts.com and RealMilk.com. They can tell you what the status is for legality in your state, and provide a listing of raw dairy farms in your area.

The Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund also provides a state-by-state review of raw milk law s. California residents can also find raw milk retailers using the store locator available at www.OrganicPastures.com.

 

Sep 132016
 

Health Benefits of Cloves

Cloves offer many health benefits, some of which include providing aid in digestion, having antimicrobial properties, fighting against cancer, protecting the liver, boosting the immune system, controlling diabetes, preserving bone quality, and containing anti-mutagenic properties, as well as fighting against oral diseases and headaches, while displaying aphrodisiac properties as well.

Richest Dietary Source of Polyphenols and Antioxident

Ground cloves aren’t just good for flavoring spiced pumpkin cake

 


Polyphenols are plant chemicals that may have health benefits for people. Polyphenols are phytochemicals, meaning compounds found abundantly in natural plant food sources that have antioxidant properties. There are over 8,000 identified polyphenols found in foods such as spices, tea, wine, chocolates, fruits, vegetables, and extra virgin olive oil, just to name a few. Polyphenols appear to have a prebiotic effect by improving the nutrition of beneficial bacteria living in your gut.

Polyphenol and antioxidant content in the 5 richest foods (mg per 100g or mg per 100ml)

Food Food group Polyphenols a Polyphenols AE a Antioxidants b
Content Rank Content Rank Content Rank
Cloves Seasonings 15188 1 15188 1 16047 1
Peppermint, dried Seasonings 11960 2 7920 2 980 26
Star anise Seasonings 5460 3 5460 3 1810 16
Cocoa powder Cocoa products 3448 4 3294 4 1104 24
Mexican oregano, dried Seasonings 2319 5 2137 5

 

Cloves are one of the spices indigenous to Asian countries like Indonesia, India, Pakistan, and even areas of East Africa. It is native to the Maluku islands in Indonesia. Cloves are a popular flavouring agents used in a variety of ways across the world, particularly in Asia. Cloves form the culinary base in a number of different Asian cuisines.

Clove, just like many other spices originating in Asia, has a great history behind it. During the 13th and 14th centuries, cloves were transported all the way from Indonesia to China, India, Persia, Africa, and Europe. During this time, cloves had a very high price, thus wars for monopoly over clove production and distribution began. Many wars were waged in order to control the islands of Maluku during both the medieval and modern period. The Dutch emerged victorious and held the Maluku islands for a very long time. Today, clove is a very important commercial crop all around the world.

Scientific Facts About Clove

Clove, as we know it, is the dried bud of the flower from the tree Syzygium aromaticum. It belongs to the plant family named Myrtaceae. The plant is an evergreen plant growing in tropical and subtropical conditions. Clove is an herb and people use various parts of the plant, including the dried bud, stems, and leaves to make medicine. Clove oil is also famous for its medicinal properties.

Clove has been used for thousands of years in India and China, not only as a spice and condiment, but also as a medicine for many ailments. Ayurvedic medicing used cloves for tooth decay, halitosis, and bad breath. In Chinese medicine, clove was considered to possess aphrodisiac properties.

Nutritional Value of Cloves

According to the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the nutrients found in 100 grams of cloves include 65g of carbohydrate, 6g of protein, 13g of total lipids, 2g of sugars, 274 kcal of energy and 33g of dietary fiber. Minerals in cloves include calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, and zinc. The vitamins found in cloves include vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, and vitamin K.

BCloves2ioactive Substances in Cloves

Certain bioactive compounds have been isolated from clove extracts. Some of them include: flavonoids, hexane, methylene chloride, ethanol, thymol, eugenol, and benzene. These biochemicals have been reported to possess various properties, including antioxidant, hepato-protective, anti-microbia, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Health Benefits of Cloves

Better Digestion: Cloves improve digestion by stimulating the secretion of digestive enzymes. Cloves are also good for reducing flatulence, gastric irritability, dyspepsia and nausea. Cloves can be roasted, powdered, and taken with honey for relief in digestive disorders.

Antibacterial Properties: Cloves have been tested for their antibacterial properties against a number of human pathogens. The extracts of cloves were potent enough to kill those pathogens. Clove extracts are also effective against the specific bacteria that spreads cholera.

Chemo-Preventive Properties: Cloves are of interest to the medical community due to their chemo-preventive or anti-carcinogenic properties. Tests have showed that cloves are helpful in controlling lung cancer in its early stages.

Liver Protection: Cloves contain high amounts of antioxidants, which are ideal for protecting the organs from the effects of free radicals, especially the liver. Metabolism, in the long run, increases free radical production and lipid profile, while decreasing the antioxidants in the liver. Clove extracts are helpful in counteracting those effects with its hepatoprotective properties.

Diabetes Control: Cloves have been used in many traditional remedies for a number of diseases. One such disease is diabetes. In patients suffering from diabetes, the amount of insulin produced by the body is not sufficient or insulin is not produced at all. Studies have revealed that extracts from cloves imitate insulin in certain ways and help in controlling blood sugar levels.

Bone Preservation: The hydro-alcoholic extracts of cloves include phenolic compounds such as eugenol and its derivatives, such as flavones, isoflavones and flavonoids. These extracts have been particularly helpful in preserving bone density and the mineral content of bone, as well as increasing tensile strength of bones in cases of osteoporosis.

Anti-Mutagenic Properties: Mutagens are those chemicals that change the genetic makeup of the DNA by causing mutations. Biochemical compounds found in cloves, like phenylpropanoids, possess anti-mutagenic properties. These were administered on cells treated with mutagens and they were able to control the mutagenic effects to a significant rate.

Boosts the Immune System: Ayurveda describes certain plants to be effective in developing and protecting the immune system. One such plant is clove. The dried flower bud of clove contains compounds that help in improving the immune system by increasing the white blood cell count, thereby improving delayed type hypersensitivity.

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Anti-Inflammatory Properties: Cloves possess anti-inflammatory and pain-killing properties. Studies on clove extracts being administered in lab rats suggest that the presence of eugenol reduced the inflammation caused by edema. It was also confirmed that eugenol has the ability to reduce pain by stimulating pain receptors.

Cure for Oral Diseases: Cloves can be taken for gum diseases like gingivitis and periodontitis. Clove bud extracts significantly controlled the growth of oral pathogens, which are responsible for various oral diseases. Cloves can also be used for toothaches due to their pain-killing properties.

Aphrodisiac Properties: Spices such as clove and nutmeg have been said to possess aphrodisiac properties, according to Unani medicine. Experiments on clove and nutmeg extracts were tested against standard drugs administered for that reason and both clove and nutmeg showed positive results.

Cure for Headaches: Headaches can be reduced by using cloves. Make a paste of a few cloves and mix it with a dash of rock salt. Add this to a glass of milk. This mixture reduces headaches quickly and effectively.

Side Effects of Using Clove

Clove Oil: Clove oils must not be used directly; instead they must be diluted either in olive oil or in distilled water. Clove extract oil is generally considered to be safe, but certain studies have revealed that they possess cytotoxic properties. There are two major components present in clove extract oil, eugenol and B-caryophyllene. These compounds were particularly effective against fibroblasts and endothelial cells.

Clove Cigarettes: In Indonesia, cloves are consumed on a large scale in the form of cigarettes, popularly known as kreteks. These clove cigarettes have emerged as an alternative to tobacco cigarettes, but research shows that clove cigarettes are actually worse than conventional cigarettes. In the case of clove cigarettes, the amount of nicotine, carbon monoxide, and tar entering into the lungs were higher than from tobacco cigarettes.

10 Low-Carb Foods That Are High in Polyphenols and Antioxidants
By
Michael Joseph, MSc –
September 6, 2016

Heart drinking coffee – Low Carb Foods With Antioxidants and Polyphenols Header Image Polyphenols are the most widely consumed antioxidants in our diet and have great importance to human health.

Based on the latest science, there is strong support for polyphenols contributing to the
prevention of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and dementia.

This article will take a look at some low-carb foods that are high in polyphenols.
What Are Polyphenols?

Polyphenols are an antioxidant found in many plants.

We can find them in foods or drinks that came from a plant source.

You can often hear the merits of red wine, dark chocolate, and various berries discussed in the media because they are polyphenol-rich foods.

Foods high in polyphenols can help protect the body against oxidative stress; a process that is believed to be central to the development of age-related disease.

All plant foods contain these compounds in varying amounts – from berries to grains and honey.

However, this article will concentrate on low carb sources of polyphenols.
What Are Antioxidants?

Polyphenols are a type of antioxidant, compounds which directly help protect our cells from oxidation.

Factors such as chronic inflammation due to poor lifestyle, diet, lack of sleep, and smoking all influence our health.

As a result, free radicals form which can attack our healthy cells and cause damage to our DNA.

This process is otherwise known as oxidative stress – something with close links to the development of various cancers and cardiovascular heart disease.

Hence antioxidants are vital. They strengthen our immune defenses and can delay or inhibit oxidative damage.

Let’s now take a look at 10 of the best sources of polyphenols.
Low-Carb Foods That Are High in Polyphenols

First of all, I have selected these foods from a variety of different groups.

Therefore you will see fruits, nuts, other healthy snack foods and some drinks.

1. BlackcurrantsLow carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – blackcurrants

One of the most antioxidant-rich foods is the blackcurrant.

Blackcurrants contain an enormous amount of polyphenols and have extensive studies showing their potential use as a therapeutic food.

In a 2014 study, a double-blind, randomized controlled trial tested the impact of blackcurrant supplementation versus a placebo.

The result was that compared to the placebo group, the blackcurrant group had decreased biomarkers of oxidative stress and improved vascular health.

Most noteworthy for blackcurrants is their vitamin C content. They contain well over 300% of the recommended daily amount per cup.

Blackcurrants are also a low-carb food, with one of the lowest carbohydrate contents among fruits.

An excellent way to get some blackcurrants into your diet would be a low-carb blackcurrant smoothie. Ketodietapp has a great looking one here.
2. CinnamonLow carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – cinnamon

Cinnamon is one of the richest foods in polyphenols.

As a spice, people usually use cinnamon to add flavor to food. Some famous foods that use cinnamon are of course pumpkin pie and mulled wine.

Cinnamon has a great deal of documented health benefits.

Particularly relevant is a meta-analysis of 10 randomized controlled trials published in 2013. This study showed that cinnamon had the following “statistically significant” benefits:

Decreased fasting plasma glucose
Reduced triglyceride levels
Increased HDL-C levels and reduced LDL.

Therefore it’s probably a good idea to include this tasty spice in our diets.

One way I love to use cinnamon is in coffee. A homemade ‘latte’ using coffee, heavy cream, vanilla extract and cinnamon tastes great.
3. Dark ChocolateLow carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is one of the most nutrient-dense foods on earth. It’s also one of the best sources of antioxidants.

First of all, let’s clearly separate between good chocolate and junk chocolate.

To get health benefits from chocolate, you should be eating at least 70% cacao bars – but preferably 85% or higher. These higher cacao percentage bars are low in sugar and high in nutrients.

As polyphenols and their health impacts have become more known, dark chocolate has become one of the most studied foods we have.

The data from this research is very impressive too.

One randomized study showed that dark chocolate promotes satiety, lowers the desire to eat something, and suppresses energy intake. These results were the opposite of milk chocolate.

Another study – a meta-analysis of randomized trials – found that dark chocolate (or cocoa) had consistent acute and chronic benefits on blood flow and blood pressure. Additionally, it also had previously unreported benefits on insulin levels.

Dark chocolate has an overall impressive nutrient profile, containing high amounts of most minerals such as potassium, magnesium, iron, and zinc.
4. Coffee

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – coffee

Another significant source of polyphenols is coffee. In fact, coffee is believed to be the biggest provider of antioxidants in the American diet today.

Due to the caffeine, many people love coffee for an energy boost in the morning too – myself included!

Previously demonized due to a suspected role in cancer, coffee was finally removed from the World Health Organization’s list of potential carcinogens in June of 2016.

As for coffee and health; well, the list of potential benefits are just growing and growing.

Coffee has a somewhat controversial status concerning cardiovascular health. Since caffeine can raise blood pressure, some have theorized coffee may have cardiovascular risks.

A 2015 randomized placebo-controlled trial sought to address these concerns. A total of 75 participants had their health markers checked 1 hour after coffee consumption, and 8 weeks after daily consumption.

The coffee drinkers and non-coffee drinkers showed the same results in blood lipids and vascular function. There were no differences between drinking coffee and not drinking coffee.

The only difference in results was that the coffee drinkers showed an increase in plasma antioxidant capacity, whereas the placebo group did not.

Published in April 2016, a comprehensive review of the benefits and risks of coffee considered the drink’s safety profile.

After examining all potential concerns, the authors concluded that “the benefits of coffee clearly outweigh the risks”.

Coffee is a great low-carb drink – just be careful not to drink sugar-sweetened versions!
5. Red Wine

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – red wine

Red wine is a drink universally praised for its supposed health benefits.

Firstly, red wine is very low in carbohydrate content, so it’s okay for a low-carb diet (providing you’re not drinking bottles of the stuff!)

Also, it makes a great combination with some aged cheese, prosciutto and a few pieces of dark chocolate.

But, it does contain alcohol. And alcohol is not good for us, right?

Actually, evidence shows that alcohol can play a role in a healthy lifestyle if consumed in moderation.

Furthermore, moderate consumption of alcohol is causational in raising HDL levels and lowering triglycerides. However, the opposite effect comes into play in individuals consuming substantial amounts of alcohol.

As a result, low to moderate consumption of alcohol may be better than either drinking regularly or not drinking at all.

Finally, red wine is one of the highest sources of polyphenols in the world. Consumption of these polyphenols may help prevent dementia, cancer, and heart problems.
6. Pecans

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – nuts

Next up, nuts!

Pecans are nuts natively grown in Mexico and south-eastern areas of the United States.

They are very nutritious, containing beneficial micronutrients and are an especially good source of copper, manganese, zinc, and magnesium.

In addition, pecans are also a low-carb food. The carbohydrate content is only 4g (3g fiber) per ounce.

Particularly pertinent is their polyphenol content. In studies, these polyphenols exert antioxidant influences to positively impact lipid profiles.

Most of all, the antioxidants in pecans significantly increase the antioxidant capacity of our blood and help prevent LDL-oxidation in humans.

Lastly, I’m sure everyone loves pecan pie. So here is a delicious looking low-carb recipe for it.
7. Blueberries

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – blueberries

Another polyphenol-rich and (relatively) low-carb food is the blueberry.

Blueberries are one of the highest sources of antioxidants in our food and have some impressive data behind them.

Here are just four of them:

Blueberry polyphenols (known as anthocyanins) help protect against age-related cognitive impairment.

Blueberries decrease cardiovascular risk factors in obese people with metabolic syndrome.

A high intake of the polyphenols found in blueberries reduces heart attack risk in young women.

Berry anthocyanins seem to improve memory in the elderly. Blueberry supplementation led to better episodic memory, blood flow and visual ability.

One of the very best ways to eat blueberries is also one of the simplest; blueberries and heavy cream make for a great, tasty dessert. There are also various blueberry wines, which are generally higher in polyphenols than red wine.
8. Green Tea

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – green tea

Another drink full of polyphenols is green tea.

First originating in China thousands of years ago, green tea is now consumed around the world.

While green tea is very rich in polyphenols, it has almost no nutritional value. 100g contains approximately 1 calorie, and there are only minimal amounts of minerals present.

Results from a meta-analysis of 18 prospective cohort studies show green tea impacts on cardiovascular risk.

A dose-response analysis showed that one cup per day increases in green tea were associated with a 5% decreased CVD mortality.

Interestingly, green tea showed no positive impact on cancer risk in the study, but black tea did.

Perhaps some of the most impressive research behind green tea revolves around its neuroprotective benefits.

A range of well-controlled studies exist, showing how the polyphenols in green tea can positively impact – and alter – the brain-aging process.
9. Blackberries

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – blackberries

Also a polyphenol-rich berry, blackberries are one of the best choices of fruit for our health.

An interesting fact that you may or may not know about the blackberry is that one ‘berry’ is not technically one fruit.

Each so-called ‘berry’ actually contains anywhere from 50 to 100 small, rounded ‘drupelets’.

Blackberries contain a wealth of beneficial compounds. Like blueberries, they do not provide a significant amount of vitamins or minerals, but they are one of the biggest dietary sources of polyphenols.

Similar to blueberries, the anthocyanin class of polyphenols are found in blackberries.

Finally, if you’re looking for a tasty idea on how to eat blackberries, then I recommend combining with heavy cream.

However, if you’d like something a bit more exciting then here are a range of blackberry recipe ideas.
10. Black Tea

Low carb foods high in polyphenol antioxidants – black tea

Last but not least is black tea.

Black tea comes from the same variety of plant as green tea. Unlike popular opinion, they are not entirely different species.

The only differences come in the processing of the leaves.

Workers pick and dry green tea immediately. On the other hand, they wait for black tea leaves to ferment in the sun before drying.

Compared to green tea, black tea has a higher amount of some antioxidants (theaflavins) and a lower amount of others (catechins).

Both of these polyphenols have protective health benefits for our body.

Black tea has potential cancer-preventive effects in the body, though this needs further investigation.

Another study claims that clear, sufficient evidence shows reduced cardiovascular disease risk when drinking more than 3 cups of black tea per day.
Summary

Infographic showing sources of low carb polyphenols and antioxidants

 

Top 25  Riches Food Sources of Polyphenols (per serving)

  1. Black Elderberry
  2. Black Chokeberry
  3. Blackcurrant
  4. Highbush blueberry
  5. Globe artichoke heads
  6. Coffee, filtered
  7. Lowbush Blueberry
  8. Sweet Cherry
  9. Strawberry
  10. Blackberry
  11. Plum
  12. Red Raspberry
  13. Flaxseed Meal
  14. Dark Chocolate
  15. Chestnut
  16. Black Tea
  17. Green Tea
  18. Pure Apple Juice
  19. Apple
  20. Whole Grain Rye Bread
  21. Hazelnut
  22. red wine
  23. Soy Yogurt
  24. Cocoa Powder
  25. Pure Pomegranate Juice

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