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Achieve Super Immunity and Improve Health Without Drugs
  Believe it or not, there are people in this world that do not rely upon medication to eliminate their symptoms, improve health, and reverse the disease process.

We can supercharge our immune system to protect our bodies against disease — everything from the common cold to cancer. Nutritional science has made phenomenal strides and discoveries in recent years, and when this new research is applied it enables us to seize control of our health like never before. Dr. Fuhrman explains this new science in his book, Super Immunity, providing everything you need to know to put this knowledge into action in your kitchen and in your life.

Combining the latest data from clinical tests, nutritional research, and results from thousands of patients, Dr. Fuhrman proves that super immunity exists and is well within reach for those who choose it. We all have the ability to live healthier, stronger, and longer than ever before.

A medical doctor, graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. Fuhrman examines all aspects of your individual health needs and determines the ideal balance of nutrients. With his sensible approach to education-based healing, Joel Fuhrman, M.D. has successfully eliminated drugs and pain medication for thousands of patients.

About Dr. Fuhrman
Joel Fuhrman, M.D. is a board-certified family physician, and nutritional researcher, who specializes in preventing and reversing disease through nutritional and natural methods. He is the author of seven books including the New York Times bestseller Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss and his newest release Super Immunity: The Essential Nutrition Guide for Boosting your Body’s Defenses to Live Longer, Stronger and Disease Free. As one of the country’s leading experts in nutritional and natural healing, Dr. Fuhrman’s articles, case studies, and advice are widely published, from medical journals such as the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Orthopedics and Nutrition Journal, to consumer publications such as Mothering Magazine and Health Science. He has appeared on hundreds of radio and television shows including: ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CNN, Today, Good Morning America, the Discovery Channel, TV Food Network, and the Dr. Oz Show. His own television program, 3 Steps to Incredible Health!, directly addresses the crisis of obesity and chronic disease plaguing America and helps support PBS stations nationwide.Dr. Fuhrman is actively involved in scientific research on human nutrition, and has published in several peer-reviewed scientific journals. His discoveries regarding food addiction and human hunger were published in Nutrition Journalin November 2010, in a paper entitled ‘Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet.’ Currently his research activities include working with researchers on the National Institutes of Health on nutritional interventions for specific autoimmune diseases.Dr. Fuhrman is the Research Director of the Nutritional Research Foundation. Dr. Fuhrman is a founding member and on the board of directors of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.Dr. Fuhrman is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (1988), and has received the St. Joseph’s Family Practice Resident’s Teaching Award for his contribution to the education of residents. In addition, Dr. Fuhrman speaks to other physicians at hospital grand rounds and provides nutritional education to physicians for CME credit. His lectures have been approved for physicians’ continuing education via the American Academy of Family Physicians and many doctors of all specialties have attended his conferences.As a former world class figure skater and member of the U.S. World Figure Skating Team, he placed second in the 1973 U.S. National Pairs Championships and third in the 1976 World Professional Pairs Skating Championship in Jaca, Spain. Today, he is an active participant in multiple sports and is a health and fitness enthusiast. His dedication to sports medicine, foot and body alignment, injury prevention, human performance and longevity speaks to these lifelong interests. Along with his nutritional expertise, Dr. Fuhrman has been involved professionally with sports medical committees, advised professional and Olympic athletes, and has lectured to athletic trainers and world-class athletes for maximizing performance and preventing injury. In an invited review in Current Sports Medicine Reports in July 2010 entitled ‘Fueling the Vegetarian (Vegan) Athlete,’ Dr. Fuhrman discussed strategies for reaching caloric needs and performance benefits of a high-nutrient, plant-based diet for athletes.

 

Spotlight on Reversing and Preventing Disease
We know so much about nutrition and its powerful effects to create disease or protect against disease. However, the question that seems unanswered to the majority of our population is what constitutes a healthy diet that is actually disease protecting versus one that is disease promoting? What degree of nutritional excellence is necessary to make a diet therapeutically disease reversing? How do we measure the quality of our diet or the degree of nutritional excellence we are obtaining?Eat For Health answers these questions with logic and science. It is not just a weight loss program. It gives individuals the ability to measure and intuitively judge the nutritional quality of their diet in order to discern whether their diet is optimal for delivering the therapeutic effects for disease reversal and prevention. How do we design the right diet for those with multiple risk factors or a poor family history? What if you are faced with a serious health challenge, how should your diet be structured for maximum therapeutic effects? Eat For Healthallows a person to assess their own health needs and determine what level of dietary excellence they uniquely require to begin healing and retraining their taste to prefer healthier options.The quality of a diet can be judged base on three simple criteria.1.      Levels of micro-nutrients (vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals) per calorie.2.      Amounts of macro-nutrients (fat, carbohydrate, protein) to meet individual needs, without excessive calories that may lead to weight gain or health compromise.3.      Avoidance of potentially toxic substances(such as trans fats) and limited amounts of other potentially harmful substances (such as sodium).A person who follows Eat For Health is called a nutritarian, and understands that food has powerful disease–protecting and therapeutic effects and seeks to consume a broad array of micro-nutrients via their food choices. It is not sufficient to merely avoid fats. It is not sufficient for the diet to have a low glycemic index. It is not sufficient for the diet to be low in animal products. It is not sufficient for the diet to be mostly raw food. A truly healthy diet must be micro-nutrient rich and the micro-nutrient richness must be adjusted to meet individual needs. The foods with the highest micro-nutrient per calorie scores are green vegetables, colorful vegetables, and fresh fruits. For optimal health and to combat disease, it is necessary to consume enough of these foods.Few people could expect to have optimal health without attention to the consumption of high micronutrient foods. For example, a vegan diet centered on high starch vegetables or grains such as rice, potato and wheat, may not contain sufficient micronutrient richness for disease–reversal or to maximize longevity and in some individuals the lack of attention to micronutrient density may be disease–causing.What makes Eat For Health unique

  • It’s more than just weight loss. Menu plans, recipes, and dietary suggestions are based on micro-nutrient per calorie density, offering the most effective approach for both weight loss and disease prevention and reversal.
  • It’s a healthy and risk free way of eliminating food cravings and overeating. The physiological and emotional components that lead to food cravings and overeating are clearly explained along with the steps to resolve these issues. Low nutrient eating (and toxic eating) leads to increased cellular toxicity with undesirable levels of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGE’s). This toxicity causes addictive withdrawal symptoms (toxic hunger) which results in more frequent eating and overeating. Understanding these concepts and incorporating a sufficient amount of nutrient rich foods is critical to overcoming this addictive cycle!
  • It works for everyone. Every person has unique nutritional needs, but assuring nutritional excellence is essential for everyone whether old, young, fit, overweight, healthy or ill, to achieve their overall health and weight goals.
  • It offers a sound nutrition prescription for disease reversal and prevention. This is truly the gold standard of nutritional medicine. These dietary recommendations can be utilized to therapeutically address disease reversal and to protect individuals with high health–risk factors. To accomplish this, the micro-nutrient quality (H=N/C) or nutrient density of an individual’s diet must be increased accordingly.

Thousands who have recovered from their medical problems have been calling Dr. Fuhrman‘s EAT FOR HEALTH program a medical miracle. They are not just talking about the people who successfully lost weight after failing for years on one diet after another, but about the diseases, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, allergies, asthma, autoimmune illnesses (including lupus) and headaches which they have witnessed simply melt away.

 

Organic vs. Conventional?

Safety
The Environmental Protection Agency reports that the majority of pesticides now in use are probable or possible cancer causes. Studies of farm workers who work with pesticides suggest a link between pesticide use and brain cancer, Parkinson’s disease, multiple myeloma, leukemia, lymphoma and cancers of the stomach and prostate.(1)

The question remains, however, does the low level of pesticides remaining on our food present much of a risk? Some scientists argue that the extremely low level of pesticide residue remaining on produce is insignificant and that there are naturally occurring toxins in all natural foods that are more significant. The large amount of studies performed on the typical pesticide-treated produce have demonstrated that consumption of produce, whether organic or not, is related to lower rates of cancer and increased disease protection. The health benefits of eating phytochemical rich produce greatly outweigh any risk pesticide residues might pose. Certainly, it is better to eat fruits and vegetables grown and harvested using pesticides than to not eat them at all, but it is also wise to minimize our pesticide exposure.

Environmental concerns
When we buy organic, we minimize our pesticide exposure, and we are also minimizing the amount of these pesticides that our environment is exposed to. Organic farming is clearly the more environmentally-friendly choice. According to the USDA, organic farming “integrat[es] cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity.”(2) Although organic cropland acreage in the U.S. has increased five-fold since 1995, organic cropland still accounts for only 0.57% of total cropland.(3) Supporting organic agriculture will increase the demand for organic produce and decrease the percentage of farmland (and farm workers) exposed to potentially harmful agricultural chemicals.

Nutritional benefits
Organic produce usually has more nutrients – especially minerals and antioxidant nutrients – than conventional produce. Organic apples, plums, blueberries, grapes, strawberries, and corn have all been shown to have higher antioxidant capacities than their conventional counterparts. Organic strawberries were even found to have more anti-cancer activity than conventional strawberries! Scientists have theorized that when the plants are grown without pesticides, they are forced to deal with the stress of insects, which causes them to produce more antioxidant compounds, which are beneficial to humans.(4,5)

The Environmental Working Group provides lists of produce called the ‘Dirty Dozen’ (highest in pesticides) and the ‘Clean 15’ (lowest in pesticides). These are their most recent lists.(6)

Highest in pesticides – buy organic if possible:
1. Celery
2. Peaches
3. Strawberries
4. Apples
5. Blueberries
6. Nectarines
7. Bell Peppers
8. Spinach
9. Kale
10. Cherries
11. Potatoes
12. Grapes (imported)

Peaches have the most pesticide residue of all fruits – 97% of conventional peaches test positive for pesticides, and as many as 53 different pesticides can be found on peaches. The most pesticide-laden vegetables are celery and bell peppers. Sixty-four different pesticides were found on bell peppers. Imported produce is also more likely to contain higher levels of pesticides.(6,7) Choosing to buy these fruits and vegetables organically grown will help to protect us against the possible risks of pesticide exposure. If you do buy the conventional versions of these foods, it is best to wash them with soap and remove the skin before eating them.

Lowest in pesticides – buy either organic or conventional:
1. Onion
2. Avocado
3. Sweet corn
4. Pineapple
5. Mango
6. Sweet peas
7. Asparagus
8. Kiwi
9. Cabbage
10. Eggplant
11. Cantaloupe
12. Watermelon
13. Grapefruit
14. Sweet potato
15. Honeydew melon

Buying organic is a wise choice – organic foods taste better, and organic agriculture protects farmers and our environment.

G-BOMBS*: Greens, Beans, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries, and Seeds

“G-BOMBS” is an acronym you can use to remember the most nutrient-dense, health-promoting foods on the planet. These are the foods you should eat every day, and they should make up a significant proportion of your diet — these foods are extremely effective at preventing chronic disease and promoting health and longevity.

G — Greens
Raw leafy greens contain only about 100 calories per pound, and are packed with nutrients. Leafy greens contain substances that protect blood vessels, and are associated with reduced risk of diabetes.1 Greens are an excellent tool for weight loss, since they can be consumed in virtually unlimited quantities. Leafy greens are also the most nutrient-dense of all foods, but unfortunately are only consumed in minuscule amounts in a typical American diet. We should follow the example of our closest living relatives — chimpanzees and gorillas — who consume tens of pounds of green leaves every day. The majority of calories in green vegetables, including leafy greens, come from protein, and this plant protein is packaged with beneficial phytochemicals: Green vegetables are rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid), calcium, and contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. Leafy greens are also rich in antioxidant pigments called carotenoids, specifically lutein and zeaxanthin, which are the carotenoids known to promote healthy vision.2 Also, several leafy greens and other green vegetables (such as bok choy, broccoli, and kale) belong to the cruciferous family of vegetables.

All vegetables contain protective micro-nutrients and phytochemicals, but cruciferous vegetables have a unique chemical composition — they contain glucosinolates, and when their cell walls are broken by blending, chopping, or chewing, a chemical reaction converts glucosinolates to isothiocyanates (ITCs) — compounds with a variety of potent anti-cancer effects. Because different ITCs can work in different locations in the cell and on different molecules, they can have combined additive effects, working synergistically to remove carcinogens, reduce inflammation, neutralize oxidative stress, inhibit angiogenesis (the process by which tumors acquire a blood supply), and kill cancer cells.3

B – Beans
Beans (and other legumes as well) are a powerhouse of superior nutrition, and the most nutrient-dense carbohydrate source. They act as an anti-diabetes and weight-loss food because they are digested slowly, having a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, which promotes satiety and helps to prevent food cravings. Plus they contain soluble fiber, which lowers cholesterol levels.14 Beans are unique foods because of their very high levels of fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes. Fiber and resistant starch not only reduce total the number of calories absorbed from beans, but are also fermented by intestinal bacteria into fatty acids that help to prevent colon cancer.15 Eating beans, peas, or lentils at least twice a week has been found to decrease colon cancer risk by 50%.16 Legume intake also provides significant protection against oral, larynx, pharynx, stomach, and kidney cancers.17

O — Onions
Onions, along with leeks, garlic, shallots, and scallions, make up the Allium family of vegetables, which have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. Allium vegetables are known for their characteristic organosulfur compounds, Similar to the ITCs in cruciferous vegetables, organosulfur compounds are released when onions are chopped, crushed, or chewed. Epidemiological studies have found that increased consumption of Allium vegetables is associated with lower risk of gastric and prostate cancers. These compounds prevent the development of cancers by detoxifying carcinogens, halting cancer cell growth, and blocking angiogenesis.4 Onions also contain high concentrations of health-promoting flavonoid antioxidants, predominantly quercetin, and red onions also contain at least 25 different anthocyanins.5,6 Quercetin slows tumor development, suppresses growth and proliferation and induces cell death in colon cancer cells7. Flavonoids also have anti-inflammatory effects that may contribute to cancer prevention.8

M – Mushrooms
Consuming mushrooms regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast, stomach, and colorectal cancers. In one recent Chinese study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day (about one mushroom per day) had a 64% decreased risk of breast cancer. Even more dramatic protection was gained by women who ate 10 grams of mushrooms and drank green tea daily — an 89% decrease in risk for premenopausal women, and 82% for postmenopausal women.9,10 White, cremini, Portobello, oyster, shiitake, maitake, and reishi mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties — some are anti-inflammatory, stimulate the immune system, prevent DNA damage, slow cancer cell growth, cause programmed cancer cell death, and inhibit angiogenesis. In addition to these properties, mushrooms are unique in that they contain aromatase inhibitors — compounds that can block the production of estrogen. These compounds are thought to be largely responsible for the preventive effects of mushrooms against breast cancer — in fact, there are aromatase-inhibiting drugs on the market that are used to treat breast cancer. Regular consumption of dietary aromatase inhibitors is an excellent strategy for prevention, and it turns out that even the most commonly eaten mushrooms (white, cremini, and Portobello) have a high anti-aromatase activity.11

B — Berries
Blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries are true super foods. Naturally sweet and juicy, berries are low in sugar and high in nutrients — they are among the best foods you can eat. Their vibrant colors mean that they are full of antioxidants, including flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins — berries are some of the highest antioxidant foods in existence. Berries— plentiful antioxidant content confers both cardioprotective and anti-cancer effects, such as reducing blood pressure, reducing inflammation, preventing DNA damage, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, and stimulating of the body’s own antioxidant enzymes. Berry consumption has been linked to reduced risk of diabetes, cancers and cognitive decline.12 Berries are an excellent food for the brain — berry consumption improves both motor coordination and memory.13

S – Seeds
Nuts and seeds contain healthy fats and are rich in a spectrum of micro-nutrients including phytosterols, minerals, and antioxidants. Countless studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular benefits of nuts, and including nuts in the diet aids in weight maintenance and diabetes prevention.18-19 The nutritional profiles of seeds are similar to nuts when it comes to healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants, but seeds are also abundant in trace minerals, higher in protein than nuts, and each kind of seed is nutritionally unique. Flax, chia, and hemp seeds are extremely rich sources of omega-3 fats. In addition to the omega-3s, flaxseeds are rich in fiber and lignans. Flaxseed consumption protects against heart disease by a number of different mechanisms, and lignans, which are present in both flaxseeds and sesame seeds, have anti-cancer effects.20 Sunflower seeds are especially rich in protein and minerals. Pumpkin seeds are rich in iron and calcium and are a good source of zinc. Sesame seeds have the greatest amount of calcium of any food in the world, and provide abundant amounts of vitamin E. Also, black sesame seeds are extremely rich in antioxidants. The healthy fats in seeds and nuts also aid in the absorption of nutrients when eaten with vegetables.
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References:
1. Environ Res. 1997;74 (2): 133-144.; Am J Ind Med 1993;24(6): 753-766.; Environ Health Perspect 114:156–164 (2006).
2. http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/nop
3. http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/organic/#national
4. J Agric Food Chem 2003; 51(19): 5671-5676.; Agron. Sustain. Dev.30 (2010) 33-41
5. J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Feb 22;54(4):1248-55.
6. http://www.foodnews.org/fulllist.php , http://www.foodnews.org/methodology.php, http://www.foodnews.org/sneak/EWG-shoppers-guide.pdf
7. J Land Use Environ Law, 1997;13(1).; Purdue Univ Coop Ext Serv p22, 1

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2. Stringham JM, Bovier ER, Wong JC, Hammond BR Jr. The influence of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on visual performance. J Food Sci. 2010 Jan-Feb;75(1):R24-9.
3. Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007 Mar;55(3):224-36. Cavell BE, Syed Alwi SS, Donlevy A, et al., Anti-angiogenic effects of dietary isothiocyanates: mechanisms of action and implications for human health. Biochem. Pharmacol., 2011. 81(3): p. 327-36.
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6. Slimestad R, Fossen T, Vagen IM. Onions: a source of unique dietary flavonoids. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Dec 12;55(25):10067-80.
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